What happens when your body is out of alignment?

A key phrase you’ll often hear us using in the Pilates Connection studio is body alignment – so what does is mean, and why is it important?

In perfect body alignment, the ankles, pelvis, thorax and head are aligned vertically so that from a side view they form a straight line. This means that your bones, muscles, joints and ligaments are all working together for optimal performance. The closer your body is to perfect alignment, the less likely you are to suffer exercise injuries or develop musculoskeletal problems.

Why is being in alignment important?

body-alignment

Ideal body alignment

When any part of your body is out of alignment, other joints and muscles need to re-adjust to “fix” this problem and compensate for the imbalance. If these imbalances aren’t corrected, you are more likely to injure yourself, or suffer both niggling and chronic pain over time as the body will remain in a compromised state, resulting in more uneven wear and tear. Common complaints like knee pain, neck pain and back pain will generally occur when the body is out of alignment.

 

 

Think of body alignment like getting a wheel alignment on your car. As soon as your wheels are not balanced and properly aligned, the tyres start to wear unevenly causing the car to pull to one side instead of driving in a straight line. Brakes and fuel efficiency are also compromised as the car is not operating the way it was designed. Our bodies perform and react in the same way, so it’s important to identify any alignment issues in the body, and work on getting the body back into balance as quickly as possible.

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Functional versus dysfunctional body alignment

How can we identify and correct body alignment issues?

If you’re reading this article, chances are you may already be a member of our Pilates studio. During each and every Pilates session, we look for imbalances, and via tailored exercises, work on getting your body into a more aligned state by the end of the class. However, for some people who may have spent a long time in a compromised state as a result of previous injury, or bad habits, a more rigorous hands-on approach may be required.

After much research, and training, we have found that KMI (Kinesis Myofascial Integration) structural body work is a wonderful complement to Pilates, offering our new and existing clients a more comprehensive and lasting method of getting the body back into alignment.The essence of structural body work is identifying and manipulating the fascia (which is the tissue webbing that gives you your unique shape). The fascia can restrict the job of the bones and muscles, so we work to loosen and reposition this connective tissue during a session.

You can read more about KMI therapy via our previous article HERE, and if you have time, the 12 minute video below from a structural body worker in Canada will give you an excellent outline of the therapy, and what to expect during a session.

If you’d like more information on KMI structural body work, please contact our certified practitioner, Liane on 0400 012 693. For a limited time, we are offering an introductory rate of $110 (usually $130) for an 80-90 minute session, for members and their family and friends.

Client Testimonials:

“Following constant and annoying pain in my neck and shoulders, I had a KMI structural bodywork “massage” with Liane. Liane is a very knowledgeable, dedicated and caring practitioner, and after one session I found I had loosened up considerably and my aches and pains resolved. I would recommend giving it a go in preference to taking painkillers.”
TG Lane Cove North – Feb 2017

How to keep fit and healthy during the holidays

We all know that the holidays, especially Christmas seems to be a period of excess and indulgence, when many good habits fly out the window. Vowing to make up for it in 2017, there are a few simple ways we can maintain our fitness, strength, and waistline during the Christmas and New Year period, whether you’re staying right here in Sydney, or traveling abroad.

exercise

Here’s my top 3 tips to get you through:

  1. Keep Moving – The body was designed to move, so make the most of the great weather and get outdoors. Try a jog along the beach, swimming in the pool or ocean, walking to the shops, a stroll through your neighbourhood in the evening, or some body weight exercises and Pilates (that can be done anywhere, anytime). We’ve listed a few suggested exercises at the end of this article.
  2. Eat in moderation – A blowout is inevitable on Christmas day, but that doesn’t mean you can’t eat a lighter diet in the lead up or post-Christmas. Enjoy a plate of Summer fruits, a light salad, or something grilled on the BBQ. When traveling, try and have a bigger breakfast or lunch so you can burn it off sightseeing, and opt for a lighter dinner. Here’s a healthy recipe collection if you need some inspiration – Recipes
  3. Stay Hydrated – Sounds obvious, but many people tend to mistake thirst for hunger, and will eat more when they are de-hydrated. Try and drink 2 litres of water a day, and drink a glass before each meal, which will also make you feel fuller so you don’t over eat. Hydration is particularly important if you’re drinking alcohol and caffeine, mixed with hot balmy weather!

Anywhere, anytime exercises:

Here are a few things you can do without the use of special equipment during the holidays:

  • Roll Up. Begin lying on your back with your legs flat on the floor, feet together, and arms extended overhead with your palms facing each other. Inhale to prepare as you slowly lift your head, neck, and shoulders off the floor (keep your neck in proper alignment by imagining an orange under your chin), and then exhale as you continue to roll up by drawing in your belly, reaching up and over toward your feet (avoid using momentum). Keep your core tight with your spine rounded in a ‘C’ curve, and then inhale to prepare and exhale as you roll down one vertebra at a time, keeping your heels pressed evenly into the floor the whole time. Do 6-8 reps.
  • Side kicks. To begin, lie on your side with ribs and hips aligned, and extend your legs slightly in front of your body (bend your bottom leg for extra support if needed). Rest your head on your bottom arm and place your top hand on the mat in front of your abs, making sure your shoulders are pulled back and down. Next, raise your top leg to hip level. Keeping your torso stable and muscles around your waist tight, inhale as you flex your foot and swing your leg forward, and exhale as you point your foot and swing your leg back. Repeat 8-10 times and then switch sides.
  • Tricep Dips. Sit on the floor with your knees bent, and feet and hands flat on the floor with your fingers facing forward. Next, lift your hips off the floor, and slowly and gently bend your elbows directly behind you (not out to the sides) and as far as comfortable to lower your body, keeping your chest lifted and abs engaged. Push yourself back up by fully straightening your arms and not just lifting your hips. Repeat 12-20 times. For an added challenge, extend one leg straight out, then switch sides for remaining reps.
  • “Swimming”.  No, you don’t need a pool… just a mat or towel. Lie on your stomach with your legs straight and together. Keeping your shoulders away from your ears, reach your arms straight overhead. Pull your abs in so that you lift your abs away from the floor and stretch your arms and legs as long as you can – getting so much length in your spine that your head lifts up. Keep your head in line with your spine; don’t crease your neck. Now, alternate lifting your right arm/left leg, then left arm/right leg, progressively pumping them up and down in small pulses. Protect your lower back by keeping your pelvis pressing in toward the mat. Coordinate your breath with the movement so that you are breathing in for 5 counts and out for 5 counts. “Swim” for 30 seconds.

Remember, rather than give up exercise and healthy eating at this time of year, you’re much better off just reducing your routine, and slipping in a few healthy meals when you can. That way, you’re body and metabolism stays active, and getting into a great routine in 2017 will be a much easier transition. Happy Holidays everyone!

 

Why is Pilates ACE for tennis ?

With Summer almost here, and the tennis season in full swing (sorry about the pun!), many of us will be dusting off our racquets and hitting the courts.

Tennis is a complex, physically enduring sport that requires a substantial amount of core strength as well as full body power, agility, balance, range of motion, and stamina. So, how can Pilates help reduce the risk of injury, or improve your tennis game (be it at a competitive or social level)?

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Everyone who hears the word Pilates associates it with the Core. This describes not only the abdominal muscles but all the muscles that support the spine, helping you maintain your alignment which is key for precise body mechanics in ground movement and stroke execution. Because of the all-encompassing support provided by the core, strengthening it will help prevent injury.

Pilates exercises will also improve your ability to manage the balance between mobility and stability in your shoulder, elbow and wrist joints. The mind-body connection that Pilates employs is so complete that it contributes to mental discipline on the court. Being able to control the breath and mindfully move the body is key in situations requiring mental toughness.

Can Pilates help me treat or prevent Tennis Elbow?

The repetitive motion of a tennis stroke, particularly the backhand, can lead to stress, tearing and inflammation of the muscles and tendons of the wrist extensors. These are the muscles that bend your wrist back and attach to the outside of your elbow. The resulting pain on the outside of the arm near the elbow is indicative of something not only chronic but degenerative.

Pilates can help treat and prevent tennis elbow by methodically stretching and strengthening not only the localised muscles, but the entire body, resulting in much more efficient movement and many more years of play.

Here are some tips for prevention or treatment:

  • When performing daily repetitive activities (using a computer mouse, carrying groceries, etc.) make sure your wrist is in a neutral position. This position could be seen as a flat wrist, midway between flexion and extension, and utilizes all supporting muscles uniformly.
  • Use light resistance to exercise your wrist extensors, focusing on the portion of the movement that returns your wrist to the starting or neutral position.
  • Make sure your wrist flexor and extensor muscles are well stretched and adequately warmed-up before playing or doing any strenuous activity.
  • Ensure that your tennis racquet has the appropriate grip size and your string tension is current.
  • Tennis elbow also responds very well to Kenesic Myofascial Integration (KMI), which is also offered here at Pilates Connection (you can read more about KMI in our recent blog article HERE.)

If you’d like to find out more about tennis specific exercises in our studio or for KMI information and bookings  – please contact Liane on 0400 012 693

Structural Integration and KMI

Background

fascia Structural Integration is a scientifically validated body therapy. Unlike massage, Structural integration focuses not on the muscles but on their protective layer, called fascia (also known as connective tissue). Muscles are contracting tissues that give the body and organs physical movement. The fascia surrounds the muscles, bones and organs in the body. The fascia gives muscles their shape and the body its structure.

Structural Integration aligns and balances the body by lengthening and repositioning the fascia. As fascia is lengthened it allows the muscles to move more efficiently. The practitioner will apply pressure to the body, working the entire fascial system in a systematic way. When restricted fascia is released and lengthened the body can return to its structurally optimal position

The continuing pull of gravity, the stress of daily activities and physical injuries can pull the body out of alignment. The fascia gradually shortens, tightens and adjusts to accommodate the misalignment. When the body is out of alignment it creates inefficiency and imbalance resulting in stiffness, discomfort and loss of energy.

When a body is aligned and balanced it moves with greater ease. It requires less energy to function. Good posture is effortless and breathing is easier. The body becomes more flexible, more coordinated and athletic performance improves.

KMI

Kinesis Myofascial Integration (KMI) is one of a number of schools that train practitioners in ‘Structural Integration’, springing from the pioneering work of Dr Ida Rolf and has been developed by Thomas Myers. KMI consists of a multi-session protocol of deep, slow fascial and myofascial manipulation, coupled with movement re-education.

Modekmirn anatomy now recognises the importance of the myofascial network, which not only gives our body it’s shape – it plays an essential role in transmitting, enhancing and restricting movement. It is the glue and fabric that holds our body together. It surrounds and connects every muscle fibre, every organ, in fact almost every structure in our body.

It truly is a continuous connection throughout our whole body. Imagine it is like a spiders’ web, when it is pulled in one area it transmits tension to another.

The body does this very well and in most cases symptoms manifest themselves some distance from the root of the cause, a bit like pulling on a bit of clothing the tensions can be felt far from the initial tugging.

Benefits of KMI treatment

  • Can ease chronic pain and stiffness.
  • Restores natural alignment, length and ease.
  • Improves posture, movement and energy.
  • Unwinds strain patterns residing in your body.
  • Can improve and enhance athletic performance.

The design of KMI is to unwind strain patterns residing in your body’s locomotor system, restoring it to its natural balance, alignment, length, and ease. Common strain patterns come about from inefficient movement habits, and our body’s response to poorly designed cars, desks, telephones, and aeroplanes, etc. Individual strain patterns come from imitation when we are young, from the invasions of injury or surgery or even birth, and from our body’s response to traumatic episodes. Beginning as a simple gesture of response, movements can become a neuromuscular habit.

Here at Pilates Connection, we believe that KMI is a wonderful service to complement our existing Pilates classes, and as such, we have undertaken extensive training and certification in the practice. Rates are $130 per session which involves a personal consultation and treatment for approximately 80-90 minutes. If you’d like to find out more – please contact Liane on 0400 012 693

Client Testimonials:

“Following constant and annoying pain in my neck and shoulders, I had a KMI structural bodywork “massage” with Liane. Liane is a very knowledgeable, dedicated and caring practitioner, and after one session I found I had loosened up considerably and my aches and pains resolved. I would recommend giving it a go in preference to taking painkillers.”
TG Lane Cove North

Information source and further reading – https://www.anatomytrains.com/

 

 

To stretch or not to stretch?

Here at Pilates Connection, our clients are often surprised at how sore they are after embarking on a long walk. If you were going to the gym or on a long run, you may not even question doing a little warm up or cool down, however when it comes to walking, many see this as a “passive” exercise that doesn’t require any stretching.  So, the question remains – should we stretch before, after or before and after walking?

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Let me first state that when doing research for this article, there are many conflicting studies and reports, with no real general consensus on which combination of stretching will be the best for your body. When it comes to elite athletes who require big bursts of energy for explosive sports like sprinting, athletics, etc, some believe that stretching prior to exercise loosens up the muscles too much and can actually decrease power and performance. However, if you’re a gymnast or dancer that requires flexibility, stretching before hand can have a distinct advantage.

According to the Mayo Clinic, “Stretching can help improve flexibility, and, consequently, range of motion in your joints. Better flexibility may improve your performance in physical activities or decrease your risk of injuries by helping your joints move through their full range of motion and enabling your muscles to work most effectively.”

There are two main types of stretching:

  • Static stretching: stretching a muscle to the point of mild discomfort and holding in that position for at least 30 seconds
  • Dynamic Stretching: performing a gentle repetitive movement but staying inside the normal range of motion (this might be a gentle walk as a warm up for running, or arm swings).

Most research has focused on static stretching, and as mentioned, the jury is still out as to whether stretching before exercise can help prevent injury, and whether it can reduce soreness when done after exercise. So, the moral of the story is – do what ever is right for your body – chances are it’s likely to make you feel better, and is unlikely to do you any harm.

In my personal opinion, most people will benefit from a few good stretches after going on a long walk, which may also help in reducing soreness the following days. Importantly, stretching also allows you to relax, slow down your heart rate and get your body back into balance. Here’s a few stretches I’d recommend at the end of your walk, which should take a total of 5 minutes (click on the link below to see pictures and instructions for each of these stretches:)

  • Buttock stretch
  • Hamstring stretch
  • Inner thigh stretch
  • Calf stretch
  • Thigh / quad stretch

View the 5 minute stretch routine

If you’d like to do some further reading about the various studies on stretching, here are a few articles we’ve come across during our research:

NHS – UK’s largest Health Site

IFL Science

Mayo Clinic

Improve your golf game with Pilates!

Hit the golf ball longer, straighter and more accurately with less chance of injury!

Did you know there are 14 muscles used in a golf swing? Given the complexity of the movement, it’s no wonder there are so many injuries playing golf, especially in the shoulders, knees, and lower back. Whether you’re twisting the body on a drive, squatting down to measure a putt or leaning over to pick up a ball, golfers are constantly twisting their bodies. Golf also requires repeating the same essential movements. As a result some muscles become overused and others weaken, causing an imbalance.

Golf-Swing

Practicing a regular Pilates routine can really help improve your game, and lessen your chance of injury caused by poor posture and incorrect swing mechanics.
Let’s firstly break down what’s happening through the body in a typical golf swing. A great degree of rotation requires the golfer to have strength and control in the shoulder, upper back, arm, core, and lower back through the various phases of the swing:

  • Set Up: the set up is the most important phase of the golf swing, as the quality of the outcome will be influences by the setup position. Alignment, balance, and flexion are all key in this phase of the swing. A good setup position is important in order to avoid stress on the spine and to establish a proper position for the rest of the swing.
  • Back swing: during the back swing, rotation of the torso works in concert with the lifting and lowering of the arms.
  • Down swing: proper rotation and shoulder stability is imperative during the down swing.
  • Follow through: muscle activity diminishes as the swing is completed and held, which requires the golfer to maintain balance and posture.

So, how can Pilates help?

Pilates is based on movement from the centre of the body, as are most shots in golf. It strengthens the centre of the body, also known as the core. Core strength can improve hip rotation, range of motion in the shoulders and back stability leading to more powerful and accurate golf shots. It is also a full body exercise that works all muscles and is easy on the joints. The end result is a flexible, symmetrically muscled body that is strengthened from the inside out.

A stronger and more stable core helps golfers:
• Attain an optimal back swing and follow-through with increased range of motion in shoulders
• Get more distance and power because of added hip and torso flexibility
• Have a stronger and bigger hip turn for greater power through rotation
• Create a smoother and more powerful swing due to evenly conditioned back muscles
• Maximize balance and alignment while rotating
• Decrease fatigue because of less strain on the body
• Hold a body position long enough to play through a shot
• Play without pain!

So, whether you’re a weekend warrior, or a golfing pro like Tiger Woods and Annika Sorenstam (who are regular devotees), Pilates can help condition the right parts of your body for a great game, and aid in rehabilitation if you have a recurring injury caused by golf.

Extended Reading:
http://www.ideafit.com/fitness-library/pilates-exercises-for-golfers
http://www.pgatour.com/news/2007/05/23/pilates.html

How does Pilates fit into your health plan?

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Pilates – working alongside modern medicine and complementary therapies for optimal results.

Here at Pilates Connection, we are fortunate to have a high referral rate from doctors, surgeons, and other specialists, who send clients to us for strengthening and rehabilitation work. This may come in the form of clients who have a specific injury they need to recover from, and strengthen parts of the body to help prevent future occurrences, right through to those who have had spinal surgery, or are embarking on hip / knee replacements and are looking to strengthen the body pre and post-surgery for more effective recovery.

Offering private and small class sizes allows us to focus on the individual needs of each and every client here, and provide a tailored program in a safe environment. We also work very closely with many local practitioners such as physiotherapists, osteopaths, chiropractors, acupuncturists, and others, to help treat our clients as a “whole person”, not just a specific injury or disease. As with many complementary therapies, Pilates focuses on having a better balanced body, and is founded on six core principles that make up the foundation on which Pilates is built:

  1. Centering:This concept is defined as physically bringing the focus to the center of the body, the powerhouse area between the lower ribs and pubic bone. Energetically, Pilates exercises are sourced from center.
  2. Concentration:If you bring full attention to the exercise and do it with full commitment, you will obtain maximum value from each movement.
  3. Control:Every Pilates exercise is done with complete muscular control. No body part is left to its own devices. It is all a conscious, deliberate movement that the mind is controlling.
  4. Precision:In Pilates, awareness is sustained throughout each movement. There is an appropriate placement, alignment relative to other body parts, and trajectory for each part of the body.
  5. Breath:Joseph Pilates emphasized using a very full breath in his exercises. Most Pilates exercises coordinate with the breath, and using the breath properly is an integral part of Pilates exercise.
  6. Flow: Pilates exercise is done in a flowing manner. Fluidity, grace, and ease are goals applied to all exercises. The energy of an exercise connects all body parts and flows through the body in an even way.

All of these principles relate to one another, and using these through Pilates, we teach you about body awareness, and how to control your mind, which in turn controls your body, allowing it to function and move better.

If you are new to Pilates, or a local health practitioner who would like a personal tour of our studio, we’re happy to show you around and share some success stories of wonderful results our clients have achieved with Pilates working alongside modern medicine and other complementary therapies. Please contact Liane on 0400 012 693 for more information.

 

Do you suffer from lower back pain?

At Pilates Connection, we have many current clients on the road to recovery after lumber injuries, back pain, and even after spinal surgery. Often times, clients are referred to us from a specialist, physio or osteo for rehab and maintenance to help avoid future injury.

The most common back pain we help with is a herniated or slipped disk (usually the L4 / L5 disc). Let’s take a look at how this occurs, and how Pilates can help.

“The spine is a column of 33 bones called vertebrae. Small, round, flat and spongy discs are positioned between most of the vertebrae. These discs act as shock absorbers and keep the spine healthy and flexible. If one of these discs becomes damaged, it may bulge out or break open. When this happens, it is called a spinal disc herniation and commonly referred to as a slipped disc, herniated disc or ruptured disc. Often times, a herniated disc or slipped disc will press upon a nerve running through or extending from the spine and cause severe pain, numbness and/or weakness in the area of the body that nerve controls.”

slipped disc spine

 

 

 

 

 

 

In Pilates, the main principles involve an exercise program promoting back health, in particular, awareness and control of neutral alignment of the spine, and strengthening the deep postural muscles that support this alignment. By working with clients on alignment, Pilates can help decrease the wear and tear resulting from uneven stresses on the spinal joints and discs. Strengthening the girdle (core) muscles, and building stability and flexibility can get the body moving more freely again when back pain is present, and also help to avoid future injury.

Exercises are typically modified for clients presenting with lumber pain, to ensure no further aggravation and stress to the area occur.  Offering private sessions, and small group classes (4 maximum), enables our instructors to provide detailed support for clients who need a little individual attention for a safe and productive work out.  When you’ve suffered a lumber injury once, you’re far more likely to have reoccurring episodes, so it’s important to continue strengthening the supporting muscles with an ongoing maintenance program.

We’ve had wonderful feedback from clients going through this back pain journey, with health professionals amazed at the difference regular Pilates classes have made when it comes to alignment, pain management, and injury re-occurrence.

If you’re suffering from lumber pain, or other back injuries, please feel free to contact Liane on 0400 012 693 to discuss how we can help you manage your pain, and get you moving freely again.

 

Further reading – Here’s an interesting article about building core strength through Pilates to help with back pain, by The Sydney Morning Herald – http://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/diet-and-fitness/core-promises-20091007-gnbv.html

About the Author –

Liane Geeves

lianegeeves-197x300Pilates Connection is owned and operated by Liane Geeves, a fully qualified and experienced Pilates instructor, (Certificate 4 and Diploma in Pilates Instruction P.I.T.C.). As a member of the industry’s peak independent governing body, the Pilates Alliance Australasia, she is committed to their rigorous continuing education program, high skill levels and industry code of practice. To qualify as a registered member, Liane completed a minimum one year government accredited Pilates course, achieved over 300 hours of studio experience, and passed two written exams before certification.

Is your body ready for skiing this season?

spring-skiing

 

 

 

 

 

 

The first dusting of snow has fallen in NSW and VIC, meaning the ski season is getting closer. Given most of us only visit the slopes once a year, skiing can be very taxing on the body. On one run, you may be flying down the mountain, and the next minute you’re face down in a pile of snow. Whilst there are some things you can’t control on the mountain, like the weather, terrain, or other skiers, you can train and strengthen your body, reduce the likelihood of injury, and lessen fatigue.

Skiing requires strength (especially leg strength to protect the knees), endurance (to avoid fatigue), and agility (to react to sudden changes in the terrain).  To get maximum benefits on the snow, you should focus training on the following three major muscle groups, in the lead up to your next ski holiday:

  1. Quadriceps – located at the front of your thighs and joining onto the knees, these muscles are very important as you gain speed down the mountain, allowing you to control your turns and soak up the impact of the terrain (especially when it comes to moguls!). The stronger these muscles are, the more they will protect the knees from possible injury.
  2. Gluteals (the buttocks) – play a big role in skiing by stabilising your legs and helping you to balance. Conditioning your gluteal muscles will also help increase your power and endurance.
  3. Abdominals – essential for core stability on the slopes, helping you to stay upright, turn more easily, and prevent lower back injury.

We spend so much time and effort making arrangements for a ski holiday when it comes to accommodation, transport, and equipment, but don’t forget, if your body isn’t in the right condition, it can lead to soreness and injury. It’s all very well having a great first day on the slopes, but if you’re so stiff that you can’t get out of bed on day two, it can put a real dampener on the trip!

Pilates is a great way to strengthen all of the muscles groups essential for skiing, and can help pave the way for a more enjoyable and injury free holiday. If you’d like to find out more about how Pilates Connection can get you ready for the ski season, please phone Liane on 0400 012 693.

5 Reasons You Will Love Pilates Connection Jumpboard Reformer Classes

Reformer jump board

Since introducing Pilates Reformer Classes, it has become quite apparent that our Jumpboard Pilates Reformer Classes are one of the most popular classes. If you have never taken a Jumpboard Reformer Class you and your legs are missing out. The jumpboard is a padded plate that replaces the foot bar on the reformer and provides an excellent and non-weight bearing method to increase heart rate. The Jumpboard workout is safe and much easier on the joints than running. There is no jarring of the knee joints.

 

  1. Low Impact

    You are “jumping” while lying down. The low impact exercise gives you the aerobic benefit of a rebounder while protecting your knees and back from the jarring impact of landing.
  2. Abs

    Yes, using the jumpboard is a great abdominal workout. Your abdominals need to work overtime on a light spring setting.

  3. Calorie Burn

    This is the class where you will feel the burn. You can control the intensity.

  4. Exercise While Lying Down

    We would like to say this will be the most fun you have lying down, but you may not agree with this. However the non-weight bearing method is excellent for those who have knee and ankle issues.

  5. Get Your Heart Rate Up

    It’s a cardio work out so your heart rate will increase!! Now how many workouts lying down do you get your heart rate up?

 

If you would like to try the Jumpboard Reformer Class, the first class is free. We think you will love it. Book online here.